business

Articles about business and entrepreneurship.

Bernd Christian Gassner / pixelio.de

Let people do their Work

Photo from: Bernd Christian Gassner / pixelio.de

A lot of artists that are building their reputation are used to do a lot of stuff themselves, even stuff that is not really their core competency. We get so comfortable with doint it all, that there is a risk of thinking we can do everything that is related to our work better than others.

Most of the time this happens due to us not having the money to hire experts for some parts of the production. Later when we might have the money or we find people that can do the job, we think it is needless. We overlook that there is a big difference between a job done because we can do it and a job done by an expert who is really good at it.

I just saw this in the festival distribution of our movie Elsewhere. I have sent the movie to festivals myself and we got some screenings. Now a festival agency is taking care of that and within the first month of the cooperation we had new screening and won an award.

As a reminder to myself and everyone who finds himself in the situation from time to time: if you let people do the work they are good at, it pays off.

In Search of Incredible

Marketing vs. Good Work

If you do good work, they will come.

A lot of good people live by that belief. But in my own experience and within of the range of research I did for an upcoming project, it looks like this is not true.

I guess most of us have that friend that is creating either great music, having awesome business concepts or doing some other part of great work for the sole purpose of creating. We have been told, that putting out good work will make the audience come and find you. This might have been true back in the days. Today good work is everywhere because technology helps people creating and so many people can do great work now that was not possible without computers and stuff.

But due to this fact there is a total overload of information and there is a very small chance that people who are looking for what you do, find you without you putting in the work into the marketing side of things too.

Promoting your art and selling it is not bad. There is no selling out if you stay true to your craft and vision. Selling out is doing whatever works in order to get the money.

So the question is not if you should focus on doing good work or marketing. In order to be successfull with your art, you need both.

In order for our work to have an impact, it must first have an audience.

Working together in flexible structures as strategy in niche markets

When active in a nice market people tend to avoid working with other people in the same niche. One is afraid of losing possible customers to the others.

In most cases it is much better to do the opposite and connect with as many active people in your field as possible.

I use an example from our austrian hip hop scene to show why:

There is a loose group of dancers that are responsible for doing a ton of projects, despite the fact that they are not in the same crew. Under different leadership they are doing event management, theater productions, movies, commercial shows, fashion labels and music production. The advantage is that everyone has an experienced workforce and at the same time more work during the year. All of this would not be happening if we avoided each other.

Screenshot der KSVF Homepage

Artists Social Insurance Fund

Today I sent in the last papers for my application to the austrian artists social insurance fund. It pays a part of your social insurance if your work is considered art.

Before 2016 the rules were pretty strict and it was very hard to get accepted. In the beginning of 2016 the rules have been renewed so that you can also apply with work that is teaching art and promoting art.

Therefore I highly encourage you to check if you are within in the rules that qualify you to receive funding from there. The KSVF supports freelance artists that live and work in Austria.

More Info on the Homepage of the KSVF (in german language).

a plea to the djs

Todays post is about laziness … and how it does damage to people that did work that some of us make their money with. DJs that play only their own stuff can stop reading here.

The following stuff is based on laws in Austria. Most countries have their own societies for that and the details in the process may vary but the concept stays the same.

In Austria we have a very controversial insitution: the AKM. It is the copyright collecting society for musicians an composers. This means whenever a piece of music is played in a commercial context, the AKM takes care of giving some money to the people who created that music.

That’s great, right? Yep but a lot of DJs don’t care about doing their part in giving the people their money. Because the AKM gets money from the promoters. Either with a yearly fee or on a per event plan. The money goes to the artists of the music that was played during the event. But the AKM needs to know which music was played. And it is your responsibility as the one who plays the music to send your setlist there. If you don’t do this the fee that is payed by the promoter is distributed via a distribution key that favors mainstream artist and well known composers.

Damn, that means by not handing in the list of your set, you give money to the people that are aired on mainstream radiostations instead of the people that made the awesome sound you are playing. Shame!

 

book recommendation: Sketchnote Handbook

Recently I picked up my Sketchnote Handbook again. The book from Mike Rohde is a guide to visual notetaking. I have a notebook on me most of the time, but usually I struggle with catching all relevant data. The Sketchnote Handbook suggests an approach that focuses on core content and binary coding with words and images.

The Sketchnote Handbook. Mike Rohde. Peachpit Press.
ISBN 978-321-85789-7

Die Arschloch Attitude und ihre Folgen

 Jeder kennt sie. Tänzer die in jeder Battle und jedem Cypher aggresiv sind. Andauernd zeigen sie Bites, Crashes und Movewiederholungen an, dissen ihre Gegner übertrieben und sind oft die ersten die einen Gegner berühren. Unabhängig von den Gründen für dieses Verhalten, bin ich der Meinung, dass eine solche Attitude fast immer schlecht für die Tänzer selbst ist.