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dance espresso

But you are not a pro!

Sometimes people use really stupid things to try and diss each other, like the phrase “but you are not a pro.” It is absolutely beyond me, how anyone could think this is a clever way to diss somebody. Check it out in the new Dance Espresso.

Reasons why “but you are not a pro” is absolutely bonkers

  • Being a pro is not related to your level on the dance floor but comes down to a lot of other skills too
  • Not becoming a pro can be a smart decision for a lot of people who want to keep their passion pure and not connected to the need for making money
  • Dissing somebody for his job choices should not be a thing at all. Don’t we have better stuff to do? I think, we have.
Categories
dance espresso

How to give proper feedback and who not to ask

This is a follow-up to the previous episode of Dance EspressoChris Cross and Parrish had good comments about feedback and how to give feedback properly.

If asked, offer valuable feedback

When somebody approaches you and asks for your opinion “It was nice” is not an appropriate answer. At least not, if you care for the person that is asking. If you genuinely care for the person, tell them what you liked, what you disliked, and what you would change. If you are capable of doing so, tell them the reasons for it.

Offering this detailed response, you give them something to work with, which will help them to grow in their craft. There is a particular trend that goes hand in hand with the nonsense called political correctness, where people don’t offer any critique to spare the artist a negative emotional response. While most consider that being nice, it is irresponsible to value the short-term comfort of the artist over long-term growth. If you care, be honest.

Do not correct a fool, or he will hate you; correct a wise man, and he will appreciate you.

Don’t even bother asking the wrong people

Please don’t waste your time, getting feedback from people who do what I mentioned above. You know who in your circle is never giving negative feedback. That is either because they love everything, or are not used to speak their mind to share something real, because they are too worried about your feelings.

Let me ask for feedback

Let me know if you dig Dance Espresso. What would you do different? Where do you see room for improvement? What topics do you want to see next? There is a long list of topics I can cover, but I think running this more like an open exchange, would be much more fun. Feel free to drop a comment or reach out via email or dm.

Categories
blog dance espresso

4 important things to consider when receiving feedback

As we talked about showing our art to the world, the next inevitable step in the chain is receiving feedback. Sometimes because we ask for it, sometimes because people want to share their thoughts. Getting other people’s thoughts about our work is probably the best way to learn about things and improve what we do. Here are 4 crucial things to understand when listening to feedback, in Dance Espresso episode 4.

Don’t confuse the messenger for the message

We should be able to separate our personal feelings for the persons who feedback from what they are saying. Being likable does not make one’s opinion more valuable or right. More often than not, the most valuable input comes from people who don’t sugarcoat what they have to say. Try to give every opinion the same amount of thought from your side, no matter whose it is. And please, don’t get upset without listening.

Don’t take fighting advice from people who never stood in the arena

Try to get feedback from people who have experience in what you are doing. When we talk about dance, get your input from dancers, choreographers, producers, directors, or dance curators, producers. Everybody is quick to judge art. When applying this feedback, you should be aware of the audience you are creating for. If you want to reach the masses, listening to a lot of amateur feedback will help, but if you want to grow in your work, it might be a better idea to reach out to fellow artists.

Immediate reactions vs. well-considered feedback

The third point also depends on what feedback you are looking for. Today it is prevalent to present something and ask for feedback immediately. This practice gives you the first impression of the people, which can be what you are looking for. If you are doing a piece of work that is intricate and needs time to unfold in the viewer’s mind, giving them time is the better thing to do as the material needs to germinate to have its full impact. The more simple the matter, the less important it is to give people time to think about it.

A business sidenote: when you present a complex issue or solution with many implications, don’t pressure your colleagues into quick feedback without having the time to think it through.

Sort out some feedback

In the end, we are talking about your work. It is about your style, your view of the world, and your way of doing things. When a response makes no sense for you, goes against what you are trying to achieve, or simply is stupid. Please ignore it.

Categories
blog dance espresso

Why perfect is not the point in art

Dance Espresso episode 3 is out: this time it is about not showing your work, because it is not yet perfect. But being perfect is not the point.

  • Art is subjective: it will never be perfect for everyone. On the other hand, it will probably always be perfect for someone.
  • Not showing your work slows down your creative process
  • It also breaks the cycle of getting work done: create, publish, receive feedback, repeat.
Categories
dance espresso documentation

Make it easy for fans to support you online

In episode #2 of Dance Espresso, I talk about the necessity to make it easy for fans to support our work online. People are eager to support, but they are used to easy means to an end.

How to make it easy for people to support you online?

  • Have your art and services available online to purchase?
  • If you teach, have some of your classes online. It’s Covid-safe and you can reach people that live abroad who would not be able to join regular classes.
  • If you want to accept donations, have Paypal, Ko-Fi, Patreon or something similar (if you prefer, let it be onlyfans.com) set up to receive them.
Categories
dance espresso documentation

Dance Espresso episode 1

How to support artists and culture in times of a Lockdown?

I launched a new Instagram series called Dance Espresso. It is an ultra-short video format where I present ideas, concepts or methods that should inspire growth in your personal dance, dance business or another artistic journey.

The official Dance Espresso logo

I try to keep every episode as short as possible as it forces me to get straight to the point and practise my skills in communicating clearly. The idea is to give it the vibe of a short chat while grabbing an Espresso at the cafe of your choice.

For now, check out episode 1 below:

Sieh dir diesen Beitrag auf Instagram an

Read the caption for more details! Many countries are either sliding directly into Covid-19 lockdown #2 or are already locked down. This hits artists and people working in culture extra hard. While there are some government support and public funding, most people are on their own. Here are 3 possibilities to support your fellow artists during the lockdown, when shows are canceled and culture venues closed. I wrote a longer post about the topic on my blog, which you can find via my bio link. As one integral part of helping artists make it through the lockdown is sharing their work to have more eyeballs on it and potentially show it to new fans >> tag your artist friends in the comments and add a hashtag for their main discipline. I will do this as well, but can only tag 20 people. If I miss someone, please add them to your comment. Peace #sharingiscaring #danceespresso #artistssupportartists

Ein Beitrag geteilt von FraGue Moser-Kindler (@thefrague) am